What I remember most about home was the structure itself, the actual, physical building.  We didn’t have a cookie-cutter house with paneling on its sides… no, we had a brick house *cues Brick House by Commodores*.  We had multi-colored brick laid throughout the house that gave it an earthy kaleidoscope of burgundy’s, oranges, and browns.  Strong and sturdy, our house could weather any storm.

My name is Phillip Mosley, and this is my Crystal Stair.

Years later when I was older my mother told me, “Phillip, when looking for a house, make sure you look for brick. Brick means it has a solid foundation.  That side paneling can fly away and break, not brick.”  I’m sure she was only talking about houses then, but having that concept of having a strong foundation stuck with me.  A brick house and a strong foundation could be analogized to anything in life.

When I was in college I majored in Exercise Science with a minor in holistic care.  I was captivated by the idea of not only physical health but spiritual and emotional health as well. My passion for holistic care was ignited by my mother, She understood that our bodies are powerful and have the ability to do amazing things.  She introduced me to my first holistic doctor, a naturopath, who helped me with lower back pain. It was those experiences that ultimately has led me to pursue a career as a Doctor of Chiropractic. I now understand how I can now educate others about the power that made the body, being the same source that heals the body.

____________________

Every day at 5 pm, I have a phone alarm that rings with a message that flashes across the screen: How are you feeling? And every day at 5 pm I take a pulse check to see how I’m doing; am I physically, mentally and emotionally okay?  By this point, I’ve received that notification for years, so it almost seems like second nature.  But what happens when the day comes and I’m not ‘good’? What happens when my brick foundation becomes shaky? 

You reach into your toolbox and start building again.

Change your mentality.  Failure and hardship are lessons; they’re tools.  When your house gets damaged by a storm, you may dwell on the fact that you lost a house, but you now have the opportunity to rebuild your foundation with better, stronger materials.

Beautiful Black Men, we’ve been the foundation for many things in this country.  We’ve had to be resilient, living through the worst of the worst, and still, we’ve adapted using our shortcomings as tools to build the foundation on which others can.  All it takes is discipline and the resilience to never give up, and I believe that YOU can do it.